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to get it out of them, right? what goes on behind the curtain? john dickerson, cbs news. >> don't forget slate go too. ' and again the best online magazine other than the atlantic, slate. >> i can't tell whether we are in the living room or a therapy room. >> we've got 20 minutes until the show departs for i hope can tune or something. let's start with both of you on the candidates in the last campaign and now we are here for this one. one was different this time around? >> nothing. [laughter] >> you know, it was entirely different from the beginning. there is a lot that has been written about what was different. of course in the first campaign there was this amazing wave of excitement and enthusiasm and many people were projecting what they wanted the than candidate senator obama to be. and this time there was no question it was hard fought. there were harder days. there wasn't a wave at the end as we all know. a very i will call him very senior administration officials said to me, which i think this is a very good analogy for it that the first campaign was like being in a relationship
. ken follett speaks with charles osgood, anchor cbs news sunday morning at it historical society in new york city. >> good evening to all of you. we were told ten and to go -- i have to say i know you from so many years of reading your terrific books. most of the people here tonight, tremendous pleasure. one critic -- being able to get lost in a wonderful story and come out days or weeks later feeling something you didn't before. i appreciate what you do so much. in day today journalism we are in awe of something historical, a trilogy, this is a tiny little piece, i learned on the cbs morning news that you too are in day-to-day journalism until your car broke down. >> close to the truth. my first job as a newspaper reporter, i worked for the south wales -- my home town newspaper. i work for a london paper, the evening news and it is true that my car broke down and i couldn't afford to get it fixed and i went to the bank and asked them, i needed 200 pounds. quite a lot of money in those days and asked the bank for a loan and they said no. a colleague on the newspaper had written a thrill
or the cbs evening news, there is a basic impulse on the part of the anchor and the reporters to tell it straight. but cable is where you are getting the opinion. this is your getting the opinion also on the networks so everybody is running around in a circle pointing fingers of everybody saying you are not admitting it. estimate it isn't so much a matter of the bias that the networks. the problem is they simply are not putting the money into the kind of news coverage that is vital to democracy. the money would help in that for one thing you would open up when has the world ever been in your experience and more dangerous place than it is right now? i happen to believe it's the worst times in the cold war. we are the brink of nuclear war with the cuban missile crisis the the fact of the matter there was a balance between the great. these days we need information from the third world more than we ever needed it before. we don't have the reporters out there. >> that's absolutely true. i'm sorry to say at this particular time that we have run out of time which is the relentless clock as r
joined abc news in 1963 could i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right come together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. that's enough to depress anybody. [laughter] so, ted, what in god's name have we learned about our craft of journalism in all of these things? >> i think we have learned not to make predictions. >> i predict that your title, provocative as it may be, may be premature. i think that when americans finally realize how bad things are and what terrible straits our political system is in, i think that may be a resurgence of the kind of journalism that you and i grew up with. >> that is a marvelous very optimistic. >> actually it's a very terrible thought because it suggests the ship almost has to sink before people are willing to jump back into the lifeboats. >> but do you think that we can truly even define journalism? if somebody walked into the room right now and said what are they talking about? journalism. explain it to that guy. >> i think the simplest way to explain it is to to get back to when you and i were young and what you and i be
into the following interesting. ted joined abc news in 1963. i joined cbs in 1957. if my arithmetic is right, together we represent more than 100 years of journalistic experience. i mean, that's enough to depress anybody. so ted, what in gods name hauber learned about our sacred craft of journalism in all these years? >> i think we've learned not to make addictions. >> so what are you predict in? >> i predict your title, provocative as it may be may be premature. i think when americans finally realize how bad our what terrible straits our political system is in, i think may be a resurgence of the kind of journalism you and i grew up with. >> of the marvelous, optimistic style. >> actually it's a terrible thought because it suggests a shift of the date is almost going to have to sink before people are going to jump back into the lifeboat. >> t. think we can truly define journalism? if somebody walked in the room right now from mars and set but are these guys talking about? journalism, explain to that guy. >> it is to take it back when you and i were young and when you and i began this busines
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5